Words of Divinity https://wordsofdivinity.com Where Inspiration Meets Art Fri, 24 Apr 2020 07:39:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.6.5 https://wordsofdivinity.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/cropped-Webp.net-resizeimage-1-1-32x32.png Words of Divinity https://wordsofdivinity.com 32 32 St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen https://wordsofdivinity.com/st-fidelis-of-sigmaringen/ Fri, 24 Apr 2020 07:39:23 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/st-fidelis-of-sigmaringen/ [ad_1] April 24, 2020 St. Fidelis (1577-1622) was born in the German town of Sigmaringen as Mark Rey. He became a lawyer as a young man, and dedicated himself to upholding the rights of the poor and oppressed; in fact, he was nicknamed “the poor man’s lawyer.” Mark became disgusted by the widespread corruption he… Read More »St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen

The post St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]

St. Fidelis (1577-1622) was born in the German town of Sigmaringen as Mark Rey. He became a lawyer as a young man, and dedicated himself to upholding the rights of the poor and oppressed; in fact, he was nicknamed “the poor man’s lawyer.” Mark became disgusted by the widespread corruption he observed. His brother George was a Franciscan friar of the Capuchin Order, and Mark decided to join the Order himself and to become a priest. He gave his wealth to the poor and entered the Capuchins, choosing the religious name Fidelis (Latin for “faithful”). Fidelis combined a life of continued service to the poor with an austere lifestyle, spending many hours in prayer, penance, and all-night vigils.

Speaking of Fidelis, Pope Benedict XIV (d. 1758) once said:

With wealth collected from the powerful and from princes, he comforted widows and orphans in their loneliness. He was always helping prisoners in their spiritual and bodily needs. He showed constant zeal in visiting and comforting the sick whom he would win back to God and prepare for their last struggle.

The most outstanding example of this meritorious way of life occurred when the Austrian army, stationed in the area of Raetia, was almost totally destroyed by an epidemic. To show compassion he used to bring food for the weak and the dying.

Fidelis led a group of Capuchins to Switzerland, where they preached against the Calvinists and Zwinglians (followers of the Protestant leaders John Calvin and Ulrich Zwingli). Their mission was quite dangerous, but was very successful in bringing people back to the Church. Even though his life was threatened, Fidelis went to preach at the town of Seewis; while there, a gun was fired at him, but he escaped harm. A sympathetic Protestant offered him shelter, but Fidelis declined, stating that his life was in God’s hands. Upon leaving town, he was attacked by a group of armed men and killed.

Lessons

1. The Christian response to social problems isn’t simply to complain about them, but to do something to help those who suffer. St. Fidelis tried to improve society — first as a lawyer, then as a priest.

2. Our Catholic faith is worth dying for; as St. Fidelis once wrote, “What is it that today makes true followers of Christ cast luxuries aside, leave pleasures behind, and endure difficulties and pain? It is living faith that expresses itself through love.”

From Johnnette Benkovic’s Graceful Living: Meditations to Help You Grow Closer to God Day by Day

Graceful Living

Click the image above to purchase your own copy of “Graceful Living.”

In addition to this charity, he was faithful in truth as well as in name. His zeal for defending the Catholic faith was unsurpassed and he preached it tirelessly.

— From a eulogy for St. Fidelis

We need more people like St. Fidelis in our midst today. Given the circumstances of my life, how can I respond to this need?

Other Saints We Remember Today

St. Euphrasia Pelletier (1868), Foundress of the Good Shepherd Sisters



[ad_2]

Source link

The post St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
The Light of Christ — Integrated Catholic Life™ https://wordsofdivinity.com/the-light-of-christ-integrated-catholic-life/ Thu, 23 Apr 2020 07:37:28 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/the-light-of-christ-integrated-catholic-life/ [ad_1] This week’s poem in the Catholic Poetry Room is by David Russell Mosley. The Light of Christ His precious blood poured down with water and light.The Light of all the world for us was snuffed out.Just as a candle standing in the nightIs finally hushed, leaving darkness and doubt,So he too was hushed, uttering… Read More »The Light of Christ — Integrated Catholic Life™

The post The Light of Christ — Integrated Catholic Life™ appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]


This week’s poem in the Catholic Poetry Room is by David Russell Mosley.

The Light of Christ

His precious blood poured down with water and light.
The Light of all the world for us was snuffed out.
Just as a candle standing in the night
Is finally hushed, leaving darkness and doubt,
So he too was hushed, uttering his final
Cry. But Death’s domain could not contain
Him. He swallowed death which tried to swallow
Him. To give us life is why he came.
And now this light shines through the wine and bread,
And we’re consumed by that we’re meant to eat.
For he consumes all things, from life to death,
And brings us through and to our final feast.
For now he feeds us with his bread and wine,
But on that day, it’s Light on which we’ll dine.


Dr. David Russell Mosley has a PhD in theology from the University of Nottingham. His poetry has been published in Jesus the Imagination, Black Bough, Macrina Magazine, and was featured in Z Publishing’s anthology, New Hampshire’s Best Emerging Poets 2019. When he’s not writing, David likes to go for hikes in the woods with his twin boys, or stay home, smoke a pipe, and drink a nice scotch. You can find out more about David at www.davidrussellmosley.com.

Print this entry



[ad_2]

Source link

The post The Light of Christ — Integrated Catholic Life™ appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
Reflection 113: An Offering to the Everlasting Father https://wordsofdivinity.com/reflection-113-an-offering-to-the-everlasting-father/ Wed, 22 Apr 2020 07:26:05 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/reflection-113-an-offering-to-the-everlasting-father/ [ad_1] The greatest prayer we can make is the “prayer of offering.”  A prayer of offering is a sacrifice offered to the Father in union with the One Sacrificial Offering of Christ on the Cross.  We do not offer ourselves, by ourselves.  We offer ourselves in union with Christ Jesus.  Specifically, we must offer our… Read More »Reflection 113: An Offering to the Everlasting Father

The post Reflection 113: An Offering to the Everlasting Father appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]

The greatest prayer we can make is the “prayer of offering.”  A prayer of offering is a sacrifice offered to the Father in union with the One Sacrificial Offering of Christ on the Cross.  We do not offer ourselves, by ourselves.  We offer ourselves in union with Christ Jesus.  Specifically, we must offer our prayers, fasting, mortification and daily work to God.  Pray prayers every day.  Mortify your fleshly desires regularly through fasting and other forms of self-denial.  And do all your daily work as a gift to God and as a result of His daily Will.  Offer all of these to the Father with the Son, and God will accept your offering as a pure and holy sacrifice (See Diary #531).

When you pray, do you make your prayer an offering?  Too often we pray for this need or that and stop there.  It is good to present our needs before God.  He knows our needs even before we present them, but He still wants us to ask Him to meet our specific needs.  But don’t stop there in your prayer.  The Lord wants you to go further.  He wants sacrifice from you.  Reflect upon whether your prayer becomes a daily sacrifice to God.  If this sacrificial language is not part of your daily thinking, begin to make it so.  Think and act sacrificially in your daily life and prayer and the Lord will receive your sacrifice, using it in powerful ways for your own holiness and for the holiness of the entire Church.

Lord, You not only offered the perfect sacrifice of Your life to the Father, You also set for me a perfect example of true prayer.  Help me to daily offer to You the sacrifice of my life so that, through this sacrifice, You may make me holy and bring greater holiness to Your Church.  Jesus, I trust in You.

More Divine Mercy Reflections

Daily Gospel Reflections

Saints/Feasts for Today

Image: Benediction of God the Father by Luca Cambiaso

Ad by cleanmedia.net

[ad_2]

Source link

The post Reflection 113: An Offering to the Everlasting Father appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
Sharing the Word for April 21, 2020 https://wordsofdivinity.com/sharing-the-word-for-april-21-2020/ Tue, 21 Apr 2020 07:25:04 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/sharing-the-word-for-april-21-2020/ [ad_1] April 21, 2020 Daily Reading from the USCCB: John 3:7b-15 https://www.franciscanmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/SW_041310_II.mp3   Nicodemus doesn’t understand what Jesus is talking about. What does Jesus mean when He speaks about being born again in the Spirit? Jesus says, “I know what I’m talking about. I come to you from the presence of the Father. In due… Read More »Sharing the Word for April 21, 2020

The post Sharing the Word for April 21, 2020 appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]

April 21, 2020

Daily Reading from the USCCB: John 3:7b-15

 

Nicodemus doesn’t understand what Jesus is talking about. What does Jesus mean when He speaks about being born again in the Spirit?

Jesus says, “I know what I’m talking about. I come to you from the presence of the Father. In due time I will be lifted up, glorified, a source of salvation for all those who will accept Me. If you are to be saved you have to accept my testimony when I teach you about the things of heaven.”

We’re all a bit like Nicodemus. Sometimes what Jesus says seems beyond our grasp. Yet our salvation depends on our acceptance of what Jesus teaches–of what He promises us–because He alone speaks of heaven with the voice of experience.



[ad_2]

Source link

The post Sharing the Word for April 21, 2020 appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
St. Agnes of Montepulciano https://wordsofdivinity.com/st-agnes-of-montepulciano/ Mon, 20 Apr 2020 06:53:35 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/st-agnes-of-montepulciano/ [ad_1] April 20, 2020 When only a small child in Montepulciano in Tuscany, Agnes would spend hours reciting the Our Father and the Hail Mary on her knees. Her parents realized that she was a very special child, totally dedicated to God, so when she was nine years old they placed her in a Franciscan… Read More »St. Agnes of Montepulciano

The post St. Agnes of Montepulciano appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]

When only a small child in Montepulciano in Tuscany, Agnes would spend hours reciting the Our Father and the Hail Mary on her knees. Her parents realized that she was a very special child, totally dedicated to God, so when she was nine years old they placed her in a Franciscan convent known as Sackins, so called because their habits or scapulars were made of sackcloth. The child, Agnes, was such a model of virtue that she was an inspiration of holiness to those around her. At the age of fifteen she was sent to a new foundation, which was Dominican, at Proceno in the county of Orvieto. There, at the tender age of fifteen, Pope Nicholas IV made her abbess.

As an act of mortification Agnes would sleep on the ground with a stone under her head as her pillow. Until she was thirty years old she fasted on only bread and water. At the age of thirty, however, because of poor health, her spiritual director instructed her to eat other foods.

The people of Montepulciano in Tuscany wanted so much for her to return to them that they destroyed a house of ill repute and in its place built a convent for Agnes. This was an inspiration for her to return to her hometown where she established in this house nuns of the order of St. Dominic. Agnes continued to be a great example of piety, humility, and charity to all for the remainder of her life. Through a long illness she showed great patience and grace, offering her sufferings up to God for the redemption of souls. Agnes died at the age of forty-three at Montepulciano on April 20, 1317.

Lessons

Agnes’ body was moved to the Dominicans’ church of Orvieto in 1435, where it remains to this day. In 1724 she was canonized by Benedict XIII.

Prayer

Heavenly Father, St. Agnes never faltered in her deep devotion and love for You. Dear Father, may we also appreciate the spiritual things more than the things of this world and give to You our greatest devotion. In Christ’s name we pray. Amen.

Other Saints We Remember Today

St. Marcellinus (374) Bishop



[ad_2]

Source link

The post St. Agnes of Montepulciano appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
Graces for Later — Integrated Catholic Life™ https://wordsofdivinity.com/graces-for-later-integrated-catholic-life/ Sun, 19 Apr 2020 06:51:44 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/graces-for-later-integrated-catholic-life/ [ad_1] “In this darkness, Our Lord has already given you what you need.” One of my favorite parts of the Easter season liturgy is in the preface before the Eucharistic Prayer, when the priest prays, “therefore, overcome with paschal joy…” It’s a reminder to me, every day of Easter, that we are in this season… Read More »Graces for Later — Integrated Catholic Life™

The post Graces for Later — Integrated Catholic Life™ appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]


“In this darkness, Our Lord has already given you what you need.”


One of my favorite parts of the Easter season liturgy is in the preface before the Eucharistic Prayer, when the priest prays, “therefore, overcome with paschal joy…” It’s a reminder to me, every day of Easter, that we are in this season of joy and are called to celebrate the resurrection with all people and the choirs of angels. We should be overcome with paschal joy. Even though every day of Easter doesn’t feel particularly joyful (especially now), I am reminded that life is good because Christ has triumphed.

Overcome with paschal joy. It’s there, in every preface option for Easter. A religious sister pointed out the phrase to me once, and since then, I hear it at every Easter Mass, again and again, clinging on to the fact… Christ is risen. We are filled with joyful hope.

I look forward to hearing it every Easter and now… we’re stuck in quarantine. When I realized it this morning, hearing the phrase over my computer, my heart sank. Sure, I can hear it virtually on livestreamed Masses. But it’s different. It’s a phrase I only hear during Easter, and now we’re all stuck at home without Mass.

Then I remembered that I heard it outside of the Easter season once.

I was at Mass in the tomb of Our Lord.

To say going to Mass in the tomb of Our Lord is a surreal experience is a bit of an understatement. Not only are you in the very place the Resurrection happened, it’s also just an odd way to attend Mass. The tomb is essentially two rooms – the inner room, where the body of Christ was laid, and the anteroom, the Chapel of the Angel. If you are one of the few groups that are able to have a private Latin Rite Mass there in the morning, your entire group is closed in this small space for just under thirty minutes. Most of your group is wedged in the Chapel of the Angel.

During Mass, Father is in the inner room, celebrating on an altar that sits about a foot above the marble slab that covers where Jesus was laid. You take turns going into the inner room during Mass. As you can imagine, it’s one of the strangest Masses you’ll ever experience: Father is in the inner room, celebrating Mass, and you are participating at Mass in the anteroom, but taking turns ducking through the low entrance of the tiny inner room to make your visit.

It was August, but when you celebrate Mass in the tomb, you celebrate Easter. So when it was my turn to be in the inner tomb, I ducked in and fell to my knees, laying my head on the marble slab that covers the place where our Lord’s body rested. It was at that moment that Father uttered the words, “therefore, overcome with paschal joy…”

It was at that very moment that Father prayed the words I loved some much. God knew. God knew and chose that moment for me to hear those words in the empty tomb of Our Lord.

So this morning, when I was having a pity party over the fact that I wouldn’t hear those words at daily Mass (physically present, at least), I realized: “But you heard those words in the tomb of Our Lord. And those words gave you, at that moment, great consolation. So let them give you consolation now.”

How many gifts does Our Lord give us that are actually given to us for later consolation? He does it all the time.

Think of the Transfiguration. That experience wasn’t given to Peter, James, and John for only that present moment. It was given to them so that in the darkness of the cross, they could rest in that consolation. Surrounded by a mystery they could not understand, they could cling to that grace. Faced with a reality they could not explain, they could try to grasp on to something of comfort.

God has given you gifts. He’s given you moments of consolation. You may have needed those gifts when you received them. Or perhaps you need them now.

Something that happened even years ago – perhaps it was given to you for today. So you could rest in his love even when faced with mysteries, crosses, and situations we can’t explain or understand.

Think about those gifts. Rest in them today. In this darkness, Our Lord has already given you what you need.

He was present then. And He’s present now. He’s present always.


Please share this article on Facebook and other social media.

Print this entry



[ad_2]

Source link

The post Graces for Later — Integrated Catholic Life™ appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
Reflection 109: The Arms of God https://wordsofdivinity.com/reflection-109-the-arms-of-god/ Sat, 18 Apr 2020 06:39:21 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/reflection-109-the-arms-of-god/ [ad_1] When a child is frightened or gets hurt, the natural place of comfort is the arms of a parent.  This is the first thing a crying child looks for.  So it must be with us.  The arms of our Father in Heaven, and Jesus our Savior, are what we must run to in our… Read More »Reflection 109: The Arms of God

The post Reflection 109: The Arms of God appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]

When a child is frightened or gets hurt, the natural place of comfort is the arms of a parent.  This is the first thing a crying child looks for.  So it must be with us.  The arms of our Father in Heaven, and Jesus our Savior, are what we must run to in our need.  We should not hesitate to turn to God in all things, especially when tempted to despair, or when we recognize our weakness and sin (See Diary #505).

When burdens weigh you down, or when you get angry or are tempted to despair, where do you turn?  Some turn to sinful fleshly comforts, others to harsh words, and others run to God.  Run to God in every moment!  Ideally, we run to Him when life is good and when we are filled with great joy and consolation.  But God also wants us to run to Him, immediately, when life is hard.  Make the arms of God the first thing you think about when you find yourself in need.

Lord, I do run to You.  I pray that I will daily build a habit of running to You in all things.  I pray that I will turn to You with my every need.  I cling to You, Divine Lord, and seek to rely upon You always.  Jesus, I trust in You.

Novena in preparation for Divine Mercy Sunday
Good Friday is the first day of the Divine Mercy Novena

More Divine Mercy Reflections

Daily Gospel Reflections

Saints/Feasts for Today



Daily Reflections on Divine Mercy:
365 Days with Saint Faustina

Title: St Joseph carrying the Child Jesus on the left arm; Author: Peter van Lint

Ad by cleanmedia.net

[ad_2]

Source link

The post Reflection 109: The Arms of God appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
Sharing the Word for April 17, 2020 https://wordsofdivinity.com/sharing-the-word-for-april-17-2020/ Fri, 17 Apr 2020 06:35:10 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/sharing-the-word-for-april-17-2020/ [ad_1] April 17, 2020 Daily Reading from the USCCB: John 21:1-14 https://www.franciscanmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/SW_040910_II.mp3   At the beginning of His ministry Jesus turns water into wine at Cana–lots of wine. Later He feeds 5000 with a few loaves, and has 12 baskets of fragments left over. In today’s reading we see Jesus filling the nets of his… Read More »Sharing the Word for April 17, 2020

The post Sharing the Word for April 17, 2020 appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]

April 17, 2020

Daily Reading from the USCCB: John 21:1-14

 

At the beginning of His ministry Jesus turns water into wine at Cana–lots of wine. Later He feeds 5000 with a few loaves, and has 12 baskets of fragments left over. In today’s reading we see Jesus filling the nets of his disciples with 153 large fish. Jesus deals in abundance. He never provides just enough. There’s always more than we expect or need.

The exact significance of 153 fish isn’t clear, but it’s somehow meant to signify the wealth of energy that Jesus was providing for the disciples’ ministry, and the abundance of results of that ministry.

Jesus deals with us generously, too. He provides what we need in abundance. In return He calls us to be receptive and grateful.



[ad_2]

Source link

The post Sharing the Word for April 17, 2020 appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
St. Bernadette https://wordsofdivinity.com/st-bernadette/ Thu, 16 Apr 2020 06:31:10 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/st-bernadette/ [ad_1] April 16, 2020 Bernadette Soubirous was born in 1844, the first child of an extremely poor miller in the town of Lourdes in southern France. The family was living in the basement of a dilapidated building when on February 11,1858, the Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to Bernadette in a cave above the banks of… Read More »St. Bernadette

The post St. Bernadette appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]

Bernadette Soubirous was born in 1844, the first child of an extremely poor miller in the town of Lourdes in southern France. The family was living in the basement of a dilapidated building when on February 11,1858, the Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to Bernadette in a cave above the banks of the Gave River near Lourdes. Bernadette, 14 years old, was known as a virtuous girl though a dull student who had not even made her first Holy Communion. In poor health, she had suffered from asthma from an early age.

There were 18 appearances in all, the final one occurring on the feast of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, July 16. Although Bernadette’s initial reports provoked skepticism, her daily visions of “the Lady” brought great crowds of the curious. The Lady, Bernadette explained, had instructed her to have a chapel built on the spot of the visions. There the people were to come to wash in and drink of the water of the spring that had welled up from the very spot where Bernadette had been instructed to dig.
According to Bernadette, the Lady of her visions was a girl of 16 or 17 who wore a white robe with a blue sash. Yellow roses covered her feet, a large rosary was on her right arm. In the vision on March 25 she told Bernadette, “I am the Immaculate Conception.” It was only when the words were explained to her that Bernadette came to realize who the Lady was.

Few visions have ever undergone the scrutiny that these appearances of the Immaculate Virgin were subject to. Lourdes became one of the most popular Marian shrines in the world, attracting millions of visitors. Miracles were reported at the shrine and in the waters of the spring. After thorough investigation Church authorities confirmed the authenticity of the apparitions in 1862.

During her life Bernadette suffered much. She was hounded by the public as well as by civic officials until at last she was protected in a convent of nuns. Five years later she petitioned to enter the Sisters of Notre Dame. After a period of illness she was able to make the journey from Lourdes and enter the novitiate. But within four months of her arrival she was given the last rites of the Church and allowed to profess her vows. She recovered enough to become infirmarian and then sacristan, but chronic health problems persisted. She died on April 16, 1879, at the age of 35.

She was canonized in 1933.

Lessons

Millions of people have come to the spring Bernadette uncovered for healing of body and spirit, but she found no relief from ill health there. Bernadette moved through life, guided only by blind faith in things she did not understand—as we all must do from time to time.



[ad_2]

Source link

The post St. Bernadette appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
To the God-daughter, who forgave you — Integrated Catholic Life™ https://wordsofdivinity.com/to-the-god-daughter-who-forgave-you-integrated-catholic-life/ Wed, 15 Apr 2020 06:14:14 +0000 https://wordsofdivinity.com/to-the-god-daughter-who-forgave-you-integrated-catholic-life/ [ad_1] This week’s poem in the Catholic Poetry Room is by Marjorie Maddox.                                                                                    … Read More »To the God-daughter, who forgave you — Integrated Catholic Life™

The post To the God-daughter, who forgave you — Integrated Catholic Life™ appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>
[ad_1]


This week’s poem in the Catholic Poetry Room is by Marjorie Maddox.                                                                                         

To the God-daughter, who forgave you

for missing her life, “See,”
she says, “I am still here,
and would you like some new soles
for those shoes? Or inserts
to add comfort to the daily? I am good
at my job and would love to help
you.” She is
beautiful and generous
and so like God, you can’t wait
to untie all your laces
right there and then,
and you do,
you do.

Previously published in Heart of Flesh.


Winner of America Magazine‘s 2019 Foley Poetry Prize and Professor of English and Creative Writing at Lock Haven University, Marjorie Maddox has published 11 collections of poetry—including Transplant, Transport, Transubstantiation(Yellowglen Prize; re-issued 2018 Wipf and Stock); True, False, None of the Above (Illumination Book Award Medalist); Local News from Someplace Else; Perpendicular As I (Sandstone Book Award)—the short story collection What She Was Saying (Fomite); the children’s books A Crossing of Zebras: Animal Packs in Poetry(2008) and Rules of the Game: Baseball Poems (2009); Common Wealth: Contemporary Poets on Pennsylvania (co-editor; PSU Press); Presence: A Journal of Catholic Poetry (assistant editor); and 550+ stories, essays, and poems in journals and anthologies. The recipient of numerous awards and Pushcart Prize nominations in both poetry and fiction, she gives readings and workshops around the country, including at Franciscan University, LeMoyne College, Wheaton College, Penn State University, and elsewhere.

Print this entry



[ad_2]

Source link

The post To the God-daughter, who forgave you — Integrated Catholic Life™ appeared first on Words of Divinity.

]]>